Tag Archives: spamd

SpamAssassin and Exim on Arch Linux: some config trouble

I had this happen – SA wasn’t reading user_prefs out of a proper home dir:

[12071] info: spamd: creating default_prefs: //.spamassassin/user_prefs
[12071] dbg: config: using "/.spamassassin" for user state dir
[12071] dbg: config: mkdir /.spamassassin failed: mkdir /.spamassassin: Permission denied at /usr/share/perl5/vendor_perl/Mail/SpamAssassin.pm line 1577
[12071] dbg: config: Permission denied
[12071] warn: config: cannot write to //.spamassassin/user_prefs: No such file or directory
[12071] info: spamd: failed to create readable default_prefs: //.spamassassin/user_prefs
[12071] dbg: config: read_scoreonly_config: cannot open "//.spamassassin/user_prefs": No such file or directory

I thought this was due to the way spamassassin was invoked, so I tried specifying the user and homedir explicitly. It didn’t work. I tried creating a ‘spamd’ user, a homedir, changing the invocation to that:

sudo spamd -c --max-children 3 --username spamd -H "/var/lib/spamassassin/" -s stderr -D

Didn’t help.

Then I RTFMed some. That reminded me of writing something about user ‘nobody’ in exim.conf. That’s the user for which spam filtering is invoked; so if you allow per-user configuration, it doesn’t really matter that you specify “/var/lib/spamassassin” as a homedir, that’s just for the parent spamd process. For every child, the directory will be changed; for ‘nobody’ it’s ‘/’.

So I changed that line to have ‘spamd’ instead, and voila!

[12071] info: spamd: creating default_prefs: /var/lib/spamassassin/.spamassassin/user_prefs
[12071] dbg: config: using "/var/lib/spamassassin/.spamassassin" for user state dir
[12071] warn: config: created user preferences file: /var/lib/spamassassin/.spamassassin/user_prefs
[12071] dbg: conf: finish parsing

Advertisements

Configuring Exim to use SpamAssassin in ArchLinux

There’s a lot of outdated stuff floating on the internets. This one was most useful to me.

Basically, if you install Exim and SA from pacman, you’ve already got everything enabled. Filtering spam is done via an Access Control List (the last one in exim.conf). Don’t bother with transports unless you’re sure you want them.

Add spamd to daemons in rc.conf. If you want reject logging, append

-s /var/log/spamd.log -D check

to the string in /etc/config.d/spamd.